Commercial Bar Prep Lectures are Over: Now What Should You Do?

You might feel a little uncomfortable because the commercial bar prep lectures are over if-you-can-see-your-path-laid-out-in-front-of-you-joseph-campbelland although you have a study schedule, you are not sure about following it exactly as given. This is a good thing because it means you have a sense of what you need to do to prepare. It means you don’t need to rely on commercial bar prep for every little detail. Use the commercial bar prep schedule as a base and adapt to what works best for you based on your strengths and weaknesses. For example, if you scored above average on the practice MBE, you probably don’t have to spend as much time on MBE prep. In general, I recommend covering 2-4 two subjects a day and for each subject:

  1. Review notes;
    • How you review is up to you. There is no one right way to do it.
  2. Work through practice essays and MBEs.
    • in time, NO notes;
  3. Review your responses, modify as needed.
    • Compare essay responses to released responses and reconcile difference, figure out why you missed an MBE question.
  4. Repeat

Whether you study 2, 3, or 4 subjects a day is up to you. How much time to spend per subject and per component depends on your comfort-level and how you like to learn.

Keep studying and practicing and working your plan.  While you should take note of your failures, you should also recognize your successes. This is what helps you stay in control and move forward.

-KSK

Preparing for the MPRE

Less than two weeks until the March 2017 MPRE which means you need to start studying now. In a previous post I talked about the MPRE in general so today I’ll focus more on how to make the most out of practice questions.

Doing practice questions should be a key part of your MPRE study plan. You need to see what material is tested and how it is tested. You want to know what questions you get right and what questions you miss. However, you have to do more than look at the results. Knowing that you got 55% or 75% correct isn’t enough. A number is not feedback.

  • You have to know how you got that score: Did you know it or did you guess? Did you answer questions immediately after reviewing material?
  • You have to know why you got questions wrong: Did you not understand the topic? Did you miss the issue? Did you miss important facts? Did you misread the question?
  • You have to know why you missed some questions but got others correct: Did you miss tough questions and get easier ones right? Did you consistently miss/get correct questions on a particular topic? Did you miss more at the beginning? End?

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In order to change the outcome, you must change the input. You must analyze the process- what you did and why you did it- to determine how you achieved the outcome. The good news is that this doesn’t require doing hundreds of practice questions. It does require focused effort and a little patience. The best part about doing self-assessment is that it’s really good practice for the MBE. More on that in a future post…

-KSK